Gonzo

BelmarRecordsLaunch

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Via Aaron Searle, thanks Aaron

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Thanks to Max Crawdaddy via Tans

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Thanks to Richard at PBS for the heads up…

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wow…ruth theodore

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Thanks again to Jen Huntly for another great poster…3 weeks to go

BelmarRecordsA3

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Thanks to Robin for this one…

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Note Double bass legend Ron Carter on ‘leccy bass

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Thanks Broadway Bob

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Thanks to Steve Williams for this one )

BassplayerAd

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PBS FM has us as “Album of the week” this week, 11/3/13  Love you Peebs !

Belmar Records Top 10 #1

Belmar Records Top 10 #1

by Various

Feature Record for the week beginning Mon 11 Mar 2013

Belmar Records is a studio and record label operating out of Altona in Melbourne. Mainly focused in blues, soul and jazz, they’ve just released this compilation, featuring several artists from the label. The album features their own ‘Top 10’ with all songs selected by visitors to their web site, plus 5 ‘B-sides’ as well. There’s some really great stuff on here, such as the ‘Booker T’ inspired Duck Down by ‘The Allardicians’, the beautifully jazzy ‘Rhapsody’ by ‘Kimba & Ryan’ and, as one of the ‘B-sides’, a wonderful latin-inspired rendition of the Barret Strong classic ‘Money (That’s What I Want)’. It’s great hearing this sort of quality coming out of a great local label!

Crispi – The Breakfast Spread   http://pbs.org.au/node/24243

 

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A picture of a band playing in a sauna, possibly in Germany, sent by my sister-in-law Weitske Maas in Berlin with no explanation. None needed I suppose.

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My darling gave me the new book by Neil Young, of whom I’ve always been a big fan. Here he’s talking about first takes….

“ Most often the first time something is played is the defining moment. That is what I like to capture in my recordings……The master recording I used for the final version of (Like a Hurricane) was the run-thru when I was showing  (the band) how the song went. That is why it just cuts on at the begginning. There was no begginning. There was no end. It is one of those performances you can never repeat; the cherry, the origional expression of the song, the essence.   Neil Young   – Waging Heavy Peace  p-116-117

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I first got shown Triple slapping on the Double Bass by legendary Bass player and Preston Records Guru Graham Thomas, side of stage at the end of a gig in Melbourne in the early 1980’s. Thanks to Max Tinkle for sending thru this clip of Joe Zinkan, gonna go a practice now.  sp

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Sammy davis plays drums and vibes

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“Blues and country aren’t cousins, they’re blood brothers” Ray Charles

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16 year old Michael learning the ropes from big Stevie  (thanks to Kris Vanston from Central Music for this one ta sp )

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“The Leaves Stay Green”  – REVIEW IN THE AGE EG 4/5/12 BY LEON GETLER  Kimba and Ryan (Perfect Day Music)  ★★★☆  Recorded at BELMAR STUDIOS

MELBOURNE husband-and-wife team Kimba and Ryan Griffith have put together a debut album steeped in jazz traditions. They take us down new pathways, creating intimate settings that captivate. This album is a conversation. It’s just the two of them, Kimba’s light voice dancing over Ryan’s exquisite guitar work, with bassist Steve Purcell helping out. Voice and guitar: it’s so refreshing in this age of albums that are playgrounds for engineers with overdubs and effects. There’s a feeling of familiarity where the listener is drawn into a close and confidential chat. The playlist is a mix of originals and refashioned standards but again, in keeping with that sense of connection, it’s not your usual set of standards. The album starts and finishes with two difficult pieces, Billy Strayhorn’s Lush Life and ‘Round Midnight by Thelonious Monk. With those meandering melody lines, they’re not songs you normally find on albums. Lesser artists would find that too hard. But the pared back setting here draws you into the lyrics. An absorbing album.

LEON GETTLER
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Keith Richards explains why he prefers 8 track recording (also preferred at Belmar Records) 

Keef: “Dickinson reminded me of the speed with which we did things in the old days… both Brown Sugar  and Wild Horses were done in 2 takes – unheard of later, when I would comb through forty or fifty versions of a song, looking for the spark. The thing about 8 track was it was punch in and go. And it was a perfect format for the Stones. You walk into the studio and you know where the drums are going to be and what they sound like. Soon after that there were 16 and then 24 tracks, and everyone was scrambling around these huge desks. It made it much more difficult to make records. The canvas becomes enormous and it becomes much harder to focus. Eight track is my preferable means of recording a four-, five-, six-piece band.”
p278 “Life” by keith richards

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Travel – Bus or subway, prob. New York, Ray Charles, small big band – c 1958

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Steve p goes on and on  about cassette tape and Top 40

Music as sport

When I was a kid I was addicted to top 40 radio.
I would sit in my room and listen to 4IP Brisbane and wait for my favourite songs to come on.
I had my big silver painted  plastic 70’s style radio ( it was the 70’s) and a printed copy of the weekly 4IP chart in my hand. And as the hits paraded you just knew if it was good or great or  crap, you didn’t know why you knew it, it was just a matter of fact.

Sherbert’s Howzat was crap but Radar love by Goldern Earing was great, Skypilot was shit,  The Zoot’s version of Elanor Rigby was rockin ( never heard the Beatles version till years later, this was Top 40 radio, not Golden oldies) Suzi Quatro was the Queen, The Sweet were cool, JPY was crap, The Imagrants Song by Led Zepplin very cool and their song Rock and Roll, Great.

My just forming sense of ascetics was being panel beaten into shape, song by song, chorus by chorus, riff by riff.

Soon after there was the leather cased portable cassette recorder with the  black plastic mic balancing on 2 little plastic legs like a toy cannon pointed at the radio speaker.
And when a good song came on you’d hit record and the little wheels in the bright orange or lime green C-60 would start spinning and you would capture your prey on cassette, one song at a time.
And usually the first couple of identifying notes would be missed and maybe the fade out too, when the DJ talked over. That’s how I collected songs, track by track, full cassette after full cassette, carefully indexed on the inside-out  cassette cover and filed in the bedside draw.

As kids, we had no money for buying records, that was a later phase, a bit older with after school jobs, 99c for “I wanna rock and Roll all night” by Kiss on 7” single or $4.99 for the Suzi Q Album “Can the Can”. But for the younger me, my whole world was recorded onto blank cassettes.

I don’t know where the idea of the Top 40 came from. Its bizzare, songs going into battle, contesting and triumphing and then being over-thrown and I like it .

Music as sport, who would have thought?

Steve P – April 2012